PTSD Awareness Month

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June is PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) Awareness Month. The Charm City Medicus team feels passionate about spreading awareness and promoting effective treatments for this disease that affects 8% of Americans at any given time. After a traumatic event, some people develop symptoms of PTSD that may disrupt everyday life long after the initial event. Symptoms include nightmares, unwanted memories, insomnia, stress, anxiety and depression. 

PTSD is especially common among veterans that have been in combat. Upon returning home, veterans are often prescribed a cocktail of prescription pills to treat PTSD and other ailments, but sometimes that does more harm than good and can trigger suicidal thoughts. While Veterans represent 7% of the American population they account for 20% of our nation's suicide rate. 

Enter cannabis. Cannabinoids, such as THC and CBD have shown great promise in treating symptoms of PTSD, traumatic brain injuries, insomnia and chronic pain. In a recent study, researchers at Washington State University looked at the responses of over 500 medical cannabis users who regularly logged onto Strainprint, an app in Canada that records a consumer's dosages, strains, and symptoms after consuming cannabis. On average, they found that depression, anxiety, and stress had dropped by at least 50% within four hours of inhaling cannabis. 

Charm City Medicus is proud to provide quality medical cannabis to Maryland veterans at discounted rates every day. Our team was the first in Maryland to offer a 22% discount to former and retired military patients, symbolizing the average of 22 veterans who commit suicide each day. Cannabis has shown great promise in treating a variety of ailments that affect our veterans. 

Our team welcomes all patients suffering from PTSD to our Baltimore-area dispensary, including our former military heroes. We look forward to helping you find relief by working with you to determine which strains will be most effective in your treatment plan.

Jennifer Culpepper